How saving early and often can help grow your investments

How saving early and often can help grow your investments

Saving money can be a challenge at the best of times. But did you know that with a regular savings plan in place, and an early start, you could be much further ahead when it comes time to consider retirement?

That’s because when you start saving early, your money has more time to grow, allowing it to benefit from compound growth. Compounding can help your money grow, in most cases, far beyond the amount you originally invested. So, how does it work?

Compound growth is similar to compound interest. With compound interest you’re essentially earning interest onSaving Early interest – you earn interest on the money you put in at the start, as well as the money you add later, plus on all the interest that collects over time. This gives you a larger total amount to earn future interest on, leading to even more growth. Over time, you have a powerful recipe to help you grow your money.

The concept of compound growth is similar to growing a forest of trees. The forest can grow in two ways – trees can be planted by hand (like your regular investment contributions), while others may grow on their own through seeds that fall from mature trees (like compound growth on your contributions). In time, a few trees planted early can grow into an entire forest without much effort.

To understand how this could affect your savings, consider the journey of $240,000, saved two different ways. If you save $500 per month with an annual return rate of six per cent compounded monthly, beginning at age 25, you would have $1,000,724 at age 651. Conversely, if you tried to catch up on your savings, contributing $1,000 with the same annual rate of return beginning at age 45, you would only have $464,361 at age 652. Under both scenarios, you’ve invested the same amount with the same growth rate, but in the first scenario, your money has twice as long to grow, and you end up with more than twice as much.

The beauty of saving early and relying on the power of compounding is it doesn’t take a lot of money to get started. Relatively small amounts consistently invested regularly, especially when you are young and early into your career, can make a significant difference in the total size of your savings down the road. Those small deposits can be the difference between being confident with your investment success and having to worry about it much later in your life. It can be as easy as sitting back while you let your money do all the work and grow into something much bigger.

The strategy for compounding:

  • Invest early – the longer your money is invested, the more time it has to grow. When it comes to compounding returns, time is on your side.
  • Contribute regularly – regardless of the amount you can afford – the important thing is to start and be consistent. Even small contributions made each month will grow. You can increase your contributions as your financial situation changes throughout your life.
  • Don’t take money out – as your savings grow and earn compound returns, the gains made through compounding will also help you build your wealth.

Whether it’s through a registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) or a tax-free savings account (TFSA), saving early and saving often can give you a head start on planning for retirement. And that planning may allow you to reach your financial goals sooner. I can help you review your financial goals and prepare for the future.

A stronger, better you: Why it’s important to look after your financial health

We all know how important it is to take care of our physical health – it keeps us strong and helps ensure we’ll be around for years to come. But what about looking after our financial health? It’s just as important but often doesn’t receive the attention it deserves.

Even if it seems like you don’t have enough money to invest or buy insurance, it doesn’t take much. If you cut down on extra lattes or meals out, you could set yourself up with a plan for a successful financial future.

Build your personal road map

When it comes to financial security planning, it pays to start small. If you change your spending habits, even just a little bit, the long-term results could be big.

For example, let’s say you made your morning coffee at home instead of picking it up on the way to work. It may not seem like much but the amount you save could be enough for a $500,000 life insurance policy.1

If you cut down on your dining-out expenses by even $20 a week and invested that money, it could grow to almost $37,000 over a 20-year period.2

No matter what you’re saving for, you’re on the road to achieve your future goals.

Other savings ideas:

  • Leave the car at home, carpool, use public transit or ride your bike
  • Shop around for better auto and home insurance rates
  • Install LED light bulbs to reduce energy costs
  • Go to the movies on “cheap Tuesdays”
  • Clip coupons for groceries or buy in bulk
  • Cook at home instead of dining out

With those savings each month, you could:

Invest and watch it grow

A small but regular contribution into something like a tax-free savings account (TFSA) or registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) could grow substantially, if it’s invested wisely and given enough time to grow. Use this money to help fund your retirement or perhaps go on the dream vacation you’ve always wanted.

Protect your family

What would your family do if something happened to you? Insurance is a flexible and cost-effective way to protect yourself and your loved ones financially. It can help pay down your mortgage, cover outstanding debt or fund education or retirement plans.

How we can help

Spending money feels good, but knowing you’re not only protecting yourself and loved ones – but unlocking future potential – feels even better.

I can help you build a customized financial security plan to help you achieve your goals.

1Cost of coffee based on $1.70 per cup. Assumes 30 cups a month. This comparison is based on London Life term 10 life insurance, male and female, up to age 45, non-smokers, standard risk, monthly premium payments. Monthly premium depends on your age, amount of coverage and general health information. Life insurance coverage amounts represent the policy’s death benefit. Rates as of December 2015. Term 10 life insurance premiums increase on renewal after 10 years. The example provided is not complete without the London Life illustration, including the cover page, reduced example and product features pages all having the same date. Read each page carefully as they contain important information about the policy.

2Assumes $80 is invested in a balanced mutual fund portfolio on a monthly basis with a six per cent annual rate of return. Rates of return are hypothetical and provided for illustrative purposes only. Mutual funds are not guaranteed; their values change frequently and past performance may not be repeated. Unit values and investment returns will fluctuate.

Top Ten Questions to Consider for Retirement

You’ve saved well, invested wisely and built a sizeable nest egg. Retirement is within your grasp – or so you think. Here are 10 thought-provoking questions to help you determine your readiness to retire (whatever retirement means to you).

1. When do you want to retire? In a year? Six months? At a particular age?

In retirement, you’ll experience a fundamental shift – from saving to spending. The timing of your retirement is crucial to building your retirement nest egg and assessing how long it will need to last.

These 10 questions can be your roadmap to becoming retirement ready.

2. What percentage of your current income do you expect to need in retirement?

The amount of your current income you’ll need in retirement depends on how much you plan to spend in retirement. Plot out your current budget, then create a projected retirement budget and see where the gaps are.Retirement Checklist

3. How do you plan to spend your money in retirement?

Think about your current spending habits. Are you a penny-pincher or a lover of luxury? These habits will be amplified in retirement, so make sure your savings reflect this. Don’t forget to plan for events that may be out of your control.

4. Have you considered your lifestyle needs in retirement?

Travel lovers, take heed. Your lifestyle needs in retirement play a big part in how you save. For example, buying a condominium and being saddled with condo fees may not be the best idea if you plan on travelling extensively.

5. What guaranteed sources of income can you count on in retirement?

Calculate how much guaranteed income you’ll receive during retirement – such as Canada Pension Plan (CPP), Quebec Pension Plan (QPP), and Old Age Security (OAS) payments. Then, determine how much additional income you’ll need and where this will come from. While investment income is a nice bonus, you shouldn’t rely on it to pay for necessities.

6. Do you plan to work part-time or full-time in retirement?

Perhaps you want to continue using your existing work skills or explore new career opportunities. Debt and family matters may also influence your decision.

7. How do health and wellness factor into your retirement plan?

Retirement is the perfect time to focus on your mental and physical fitness. Leave room in your budget for activities that exercise your mind and body – the good news is that many of them are free!

8. Are you ready for the unexpected events in life?

When you consider retirement planning, make sure to account for unpredictable events – both financial and personal. Check if your retirement savings are strong enough to support you through a future economic downturn, a rise in the cost of living and a long life.

9. How will you keep your money working in retirement?

Think about how you’ll keep your money growing. Talk to me about investment solutions for retirees.

10. Do you plan to leave a legacy?

You might want to leave an inheritance to your family or favourite charity. Once again, I can help you put this in place.

The answers to these questions can help form a dependable roadmap for your retirement. While you can’t predict the future, you can plan for it.